Chinese Philosophy

YU Ting

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Ting Yu (于亭)
justin1128@hotmail.com
Stay at HYI: Sep 2004—Jun 2005
Country
University Affiliation

YU Ting is an Associate Professor of Institute of Ancient Chinese Classics Study, Wuhan University. Professor Yu’s major research field includes ancient Chinese classics study, Chinese traditional philology and phonology study. He was a compiling member of  Guxunhuizuan (A Exhaustive Collection of Exegetical Materials in Ancient Chinese Books), published in 2004 by Commercial Press, and was one of the chief researchers of the computer-based All Chinese Characters Encoding set and Glyphic Information Processing System. Now he is chief editor of Guyinhuizuan (A Exhaustive Collection of Phonological Materials in Ancient Chinese Books). He is involved in the study of ancient Yinyi books and digitization of ancient philological texts for years. His Harvard-Yenching research plan was titled “Ancient Chinese Classics Studies in Circumstance of Humanities Computing – Case Study on Ancient Yinyi Books of Buddhism Sutras and Tripitaka”.

Zhang Guangbao

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Guangbao Zhang
Stay at HYI: Sep 2002—Jul 2003
Country
University Affiliation

Professor Zhang is an Associate Research Fellow and Associate Professor at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of History. He received his Ph.D. in Chinese philosophy from Peking University. He has undertaken in-depth studies of Taoist thought and religion. 

Peng Guoxiang

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Guoxiang Peng (彭國翔)
PENG_GX@126.com
Stay at HYI: Sep 2007—Aug 2008
Country
Field of Study
University Affiliation
Current Affiliation
  • Peking University

Field of Study:

Chinese Philosophy, Intellectual History and Religion, especially Neo-Confucian and contemporary Confucian studies (11th-20th C.)

Current Research Projects and Interests:
1. Confucian Tradition as a Religious Tradition

2. Confucianism in Ming and Qing Transition

3. Political Thought of Contemporary Confucianism

Recent Publications

Books:
1. The Unfolding of the Innate Knowledge of the Goodness: Wang Ji and the Yangming Learning in Mid-Late Ming. Taipei: Student Book Company, Chinese Philosophy Series, June 2003, traditional Chinese version, 712 p. Beijing:  
Sanlian Book Store, Sanlian and Harvard-Yenching Academic Series, January 2005, simplified Chinese version, 604 p.
2. Confucian Tradition: Crossing the Boundary of Religion and Humanism.  
Beijing: Peking University Press, 2007, 338 p.
3. Confucian Tradition and Chinese Philosophy: Retrospect and Prospect in a New Century, Shijiazhuang: Heibei Renmin Press, 2009, 384p.
4. Confucian Tradition from Classical Period to Its Contemporary
Transformation: Speculation and Interpretation, Wuhan: Wuhan University Press, 2012, 427p.

Book or Proceedings Chapters:
1. Confucian Classics in a Changing Contemporary China, Proceedings of A Conference on Liberal Education and the Core Curriculum, Edited by Wm.  
Thedore de Bary, Shang Wei, and Rachel E. Chung, Columbia University, New York, 2008, pp.54-60.
2. Dialogical Confucianism as a Religious Tradition in a Global Context. In
2009 Civilization and Peace, Seoul: The Academy of Korean Studies, 2010, pp.51-66.
3. Death as Ultimate Concern in the neo-Confucian Tradition: Taking Wang Yangming’s Followers as an Example. In Philip J. Ivanhoe and Amy Olberding edit., Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought. State University of New York Press, 2011, pp. 271-295.
4. Inside the Revival of Confucianism in Mainland China: The Vicissitudes of Confucian Classics in Contemporary China as an Example. In Oriens Extremus, Hamburg, Germany, Vol.49, 2011, pp.225-235.

Articles
1. Is Confucianism a Plea for Elite Culture? Chinese Culture Monthly No. 158, pp.93-104, Dec.1992, Taiwan: Tunghai University.
2. An Interpretation of “All Things are already complete in us” in the Mencius. Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (1997): 3, pp.25-31, Beijing, August 1997.
3. A Chronological Biography of Wang Ji (1498-1583). Newsletter of The Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy (1997) Vol.7 No.4, pp99-127, Academia Sinica. Reprinted in YuanXue, No.6, Beijing: Chinese Guangbo dianshi Press, 1998, pp.293-329.
4. An Explanation of Kant’s and Mou Zong-san (Mou Tsung-san)’s Theories on the Highest Good. Legein Monthly (1997) No.8, pp.21-32.
5. Long Xi Hui Yu and Rediscovery Sayings of Wang Ji: Textual Study of All of Wang Ji’s Collections published in Ming Dynasty. Chinese Philosophy No.19,
Changsha: Yue Lu Shu She, 1998, pp.330-376. Reprinted in Legein Monthly
(1999) No.4, pp.32-38, No.5, pp.33-40, No.6, 32-38.
6. A priori Learning of Wang Ji and Its Location. Legein Semi-annual Journal
(1998) 21 pp.669-161, Taipei, Dec. 1998.
7. Practicing Dao and Pursuing Studies: Contemporary Confucian Scholars’  
Social Function and Role. Legein Monthly (1999) No.9, pp.28-31, Taipei, Nov.  
1999.
8. Anticipation of 21st Century Confucianism from the Perspective of the New Trend in the Western Studies of Confucianism. Confucius Studies (2000): 3, pp.98-104, Jinan, May 2000.Chinese Confucianism Almanac, 2001, pp.30-34.
9. Chu Quan Ji and Its Author. Chinese Classics & Culture No. 4 1999, pp.71-75.Bibliography Quarterly (2000) 34:1 pp.57-62, Taipei, Jun. 2000.
10. Morality and Knowledge: from Neo-Confucianism to Contemporary New Confucianism. Yuan Dao (2000) 6 pp.228-256.
11. Wang Ji and His Communication with Some Buddhists and Taoists in the Late Ming. Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (2001): 4, pp.91-100, Beijing, Nov. 2001.
12. Wang Ji’s Zhong Jian Lu and Its Significance within Intellectual
History: Relevance to the Shift of Confucian Keynote in Ming Dynasty. Chinese Studies (2001) 19:2 pp.59-81, Taipei, Dec.2001.
13. Different Viewpoints about the Innate Good Knowing in the Middle and Late Ming. Beida Journal of Philosophy, Vol.2, No.2, pp.88-103, Beijing:  
Department of Philosophy, Peking University, Dec. 2001.
14. The Goal and Perspective of Studies on Confucianism as a Religious Tradition. Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (2002): 2, pp.84-86, Beijing, March 2002.
15. Wang Ji and Buddhism. Historical Inquiry (2002): 26, pp.29-61, Taipei:  
National Taiwan University, Jun. 2002.
16. Debates about Innate Good Knowing and Knowledge in the Late Ming. China Scholarship Vol.3 No.2, Beijing: The Commercial Press, June 2002.
17. The focus and Prospect of Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Bulletin of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (2002): 6.
18. On Three Stages of Human life of Kierkegaard: Perspective from Chinese Philosophy. Legein Monthly (2002) No.7, pp.48-56, Taipei, July. 2002.
19. Wang Ji’s Belief in the Innate Good Knowing and the Religiousness of Yangming Learning in the Late Ming. Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (2002) 3, pp.54-62. Beijing, August. 2002.
20. The Doctrine of Effort at Each Instant of Wang Ji (1498-1583). Confucius Studies. (2002): 4, pp.54-66, August 2002.
21. Clarification of Zhou Haimen (1547-1629)’s Position in the Wang Yangming School. Social Science of Zhejiang Province (2002): 4, pp.104-109.  
August 2002.
22. Wang Ji and Taoism: Absorption and Creative Interpretation of Inner Alchemy Doctrine of Taoism by Scholars of the Wang Yangming School. Bulletin of the Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Vol.21, pp1-46, Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Academia Sinica. Sept. 2002, pp.255-292.
23. Clarification of the Position of Zhou Ru-deng in the Yang-ming School and Examination of Some Relevant Problems of the Records of Ming Confucian Scholars (Ming-ru xue-an). Tsing Hua Journal of Chinese Studies.Vol.31, No.3, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Sept. 2002, pp.339-374.
24. Debates between Orthodoxy and Heresy in Wang Yangming’s Learning. Forum on Chinese Culture. No. 1, 2003, pp. 123-128.
25. Retrospect and Prospect of the Studies of Neo-Confucianism in 20th Century (1). Philosophical Trends. No. 4, April 2003, pp.41-44.
26. Retrospect and Prospect of the Studies of Neo-Confucianism in 20th Century (2). Philosophical Trends. No. 5, May 2003, pp.38-40.
27. Confucian Resources for Dispelling Religious Conflicts in Globalization.  
The Journal of Jiangsu Academy of Administration Studies. No. 2, 2003, pp.36-42.
28. Legitimacy, Vision and Subjectivity: The Retrospective and Outlook of Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Jianghan Forum. No. 6, 2003, pp.38-40.
29. Interpretation of the Vision about “All things are One Body” in the Western Inscription: the Salient Features of Confucian Religious Humanism.  
Tsinghua Philosophical Almanac2002 (Department of Philosophy, Tsinghua University). August 2003, pp.164-184.
30. The Debates about the Concept of Present Innate Good Knowing in the Late Ming Dynasty. Studies in Sinology, (2003): 1, Vol.11, pp.15-46.
31. Collection and Commentary of Qian Xushan (1496-1574)’s Lost Conversation. Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (2003): 3, pp.54-62. Beijing, August. 2003.
32. Contemporary Chinese Studies of Wang Yangming and His Followers in Mainland China, written and published in English, Dao: Journal of Comparative Philosophy (U.S.A), Vol.11, No.2, June, 2003.
33. Debates about the Concept of Investigating Things among Wang Yangming’s Followers in the Late Ming Dynasty. Modern Philosophy. (2004): 1, pp.59-66.
34. Contemporary Chinese Studies of Wang Yangming and His Followers in Chinese-speaking World: 1930-2003. Beida Journal of Philosophy (Department of Philosophy, Beijing University). (2004): 1, pp.200-220.
35. Le subject moral dans la philosophie de Mou Zongsan (1909-1995), Cahier 2, “Sujet Moi Personne”, institue de la Pensee Contemporaine, Press Universitaires de France, 2004, pp.241-264. Co-authored with Sebastien Billioud.
36. A Study of Theories and Practices of the Descendants of Wang
Gen(1483-1541): An Overlooked Genealogy in Taizhou School. Studies in Sinology, Peking University, (2004): 1, Vol.14, pp.75-114.
37. Development and Types of Doctrines of Self-Cultivation of Wang Yang-ming’s Followers. Zhejiang Xuekan, (2005: 1), pp.28-35.
38. Confucian Religious Pluralism: Focusing on Wang Yangming and his Followers’ Teaching. New Philosophy, Vol. 3, Da Xiang Press, 2005, pp.  
76-92.
39. The Practical Learning of Wang Yangming School. Chinese Practical Learning in 21st Century. Beijing: Social Sciences Document Press, 2005, pp.190-198.
40. A Philosophical Interpretation of Wang Ji’s “Si Wu” Doctrine.  
Tsinghua Philosophical Almanac2004, Department of Philosophy, Tsinghua University, 2005, pp.200-222.
41. Legitimacy, Horizon, and Subjectivity: A Reflection on and Prospects in Contemporary Studies of Chinese Philosophy. Contemporary Chinese Thought, M.E. Sharpe, Vol. 37 No. 1, fall 2005, pp.89-96.
42. Confucian Identity in Multiple Religious Participations: An Example of Wang Ji (1498-1583). Confucian Review, Vol. 1, Academy of Confucian Studies, Chinese Renmin University, 2005, pp.118-146.
43. Confucian Self-Cultivation as a Spiritual and Bodily Exercise with Therapeutic Significance: Against Hellenistic Tradition. Proceedings of the Doctrine of Qi and Effort in Confucian Tradition (Ruxue de Qi Lun yu Gongfu Lun). Edited by Yang Rubin and Zhu Pingci. The Publishing Center of Taiwan University, 2005, pp.1-45.
44. The Ultimate Concern of Life and Death in Wang Yangming’s Learning.  
Philosophical Investigation, Department of Philosophy, Wuhan University,
(2006): 1, pp.171-188.
45. Reconstruction of Contemporary Confucianism: a Global Context. Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (2006): 2, Beijing, May 2006, pp.35-44.
46. Inter-religious Dialogue: The Core Endeavor of the Third Epoch of Confucianism. Confucius Studies (2006): 3, June 2006, pp.32-44.
47. Mou Zongsan’s Study of Rural China in the 1930s. Tsinghua Journal of Chinese Studies, No.1, June 2006, pp.135-195.
48. Construction of a Society with Public Reasoning: The Real Quintessence of Democratic Thought of Huang Zongxi (1610-1695). Seeking Truth. Vol. 33 No.4, July 2006, pp.44-49.
49. Mou Zongsan’s Critique of Communism: Focusing on his Lost Book Gongchan Guoji Yu Zhonggong Pipan, New Asia Academic Bulletin, Vol. 19, Hong Kong, Oct. 2006, pp. 451-494.
50. Chronological Biography of Zhou Rudeng (Haimen, 1547-1629), Chinese Confucianism. Vol. 1 No. 1, Beijing: Commercial Press, Sept. 2006, pp.  
332-378.
51. A Study of Revision of Interpretation of Three Confucian Classics by Yang Shi. Chinese Cultural Quarterly. Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong; Shang Hai: Fudan University, Fall 2006, pp. 84-103.
52. A Comparative Study of Zhu Xi’s Method of Reading Confucian Classics/Scriptures and Christian lectio divina: Religious Significance of Confucian Hermeneutics. Tsinghua Philosophical Almanac2005. Department of Philosophy, Tsinghua University. 2007, pp. 172-205.
53. Three Self-awareness in the Study of Chinese Philosophy, included in Shi Xin Ji, edited by Jing Haifeng, Beijing: Peking University Press, 2007, pp.35-51.
54. The Continuity and Coherence from Classical Confucianism to
Neo-Confucianism: The Revelation of Newly Excavated Confucian Texts. Chinese Social Sciences, No. 4, 2007, pp.104-115.
55. Reflection on the Methodology of Studies in Chinese Philosophy: Two Modes and Relevant Analysis. Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences of Nanjing University, Vol. 4, 2007, pp.77-87.
56. Tang Junyi’s View of Philosophy: Focusing on his Introduction to Philosophy. Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy, No.4, 2007, pp.110-118.
57. Mou Zongsan on Freedom and Liberalism. Thought and Culture, East China Normal University, 2007, pp.176-197.
58. Ontology and Methodology: Zheng Xiagu (1649-1736) versus Wang Ji (1498-1583), Studies in Sinology. Peking University, Vol.21, (2008): 1, 2008, pp.101-126.
59. Ritual Practice as a Spiritual and Bodily Exercise: Focusing on "xiangdang" in Lunyu as an Example, Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies, Vol. 6, No. 1(Iss. 11), June, 2009, pp.1-27.
60. On the Newly Discovered Lixue Lu by Huang Zongxi, The Pursuit of History and Culture: A Festschrift to Professor Yu Ying-shih’s Eighty Birthday, Taipei, Lian Jing Publishing Company,2009, pp. 213-271.
61. Mou Zongsan on the Relation Across the Taiwan Strait and the Identity of Taiwanese, Thought, Taipei: Lian Jing Publishing Company, Nov., 2009, pp.  
173-189.
62. Paradigm and Methodology: Hou Wailu and “the History of Chinese Philosophy” as a Modern Discipline, Hebei Academic Journal, No.4, August 2010, pp.31-35.
63. Confucian Classics and General Education in Contemporary China, the Journal of the Party College in Ningbo, Vol.1, 2011.
64. On Religiousness by Tang Jun-yi, Philosophy and Religion, Shanghai Normal University, Vol. 6, 2011.
65. Inside the Revival of Confucianism in Mainland China: The Vicissitudes of Confucian Classics in Contemporary China as an Example, Oriens Extremus, Germany, Vol.49, pp.225-235.
66. Self-Cultivation and Statecraft: Spiritual and Bodily Exercise in Dong Zhongshu’s Thought, Chinese Culture, Vol. 34, Oct., 2011, pp.43-54.
67. On Newly Discovered Lixu Lu by Jiang Xizhe and, Studies in Sinology, Peking University, (2012): 1, Vol.28, pp.25-75.
68. English Studies of Zhu Xi in Recent Three Decades: Overview, Trend, and Significance, Journal of Hunan University (Social Sciences), Vol. 26, No. 1, Jan. 2012, pp.34-38.

Conferences papers
1. “Basic Framework and Core Concept of Mou Zong-san(Mou Tsung-san)’s Philosophy from a Perspective of the Revolution of Chinese Philosophy,”  
presented at the International Symposium of Mou Zong-san and Contemporary New-Confucianism, sponsored by the Confucian Foundation of China. Jinan, Shandong, China, August 1998.
2. “Anticipation of the 21st Century Confucianism from the Perspective of the New Trend in the Western Studies of Confucianism,” presented at the Symposium of Confucianism and Confucian Merchants in 21st Century, Lanzhou, Gansu, China, August 1999.
3. “Interpretation on the Conception that ‘Forming One Body with All things’ in the Western Inscription(Xi Ming) by Zhang Zai(1020-1077): the Salient Features of Confucian Religious Humanism,” presented at the International Conference on Zhang Zai and the Learning of Guan Area, sponsored by Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, the Government of Shanxi Province and Shanxi Academy of Social Sciences. Mei County, Shanxi, August 1-3, 2001.
4. “The Goal and Perspective of Studies on Confucianism as a Religious Tradition,” presented at the Conference on Confucianism and Religion, sponsored by Institute of Philosophy, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.  
Beijing, China, Feb. 2002.
5. “Confucian Resources for Dispelling Religious Conflicts in Globalization,” presented at the International Conference on Confucianism and Globalization, sponsored by International Confucian Association (ICA), China Confucius Foundation and Shandong Academy of Social Sciences. Qingdao, China, August 10-12, 2002.
6. “The Practical Learning of Wang Yang-ming and his Followers,”  
presented at the Symposium of Practical Learning in Chinese Tradition, sponsored by Association of Chinese Philosophy of Macao, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Soochoow University. Macao, August 24-27, 2003.
7. “One Principle with Many Manifestations: A Confucian Religious Pluralism,” presented at the Symposium of Confucianism, Culture, Religion, and Comparative Philosophy: Celebrating Professor Liu Shu-hsien’s Seventy’s Birthday, sponsored by Academy Sinica, Hong Kong Chinese University, Soochow University. Taipei, Taiwan, June 23-25, 2004. Also included in the Festschrift for Professor Liu.
8. “Confucian Self-Cultivation as Spiritual and Bodily Exercise: A Comparative Study,” presented at the International Symposium of Qi and Doctrine of Effort in Confucian Tradition, sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies, National Taiwan University. Taipei, Nov.27-28, 2004.
9. “Mou Zong-san’s Critique of Communism: Focusing on a Lost Book not included His Whole Works,” presented at the International Symposium of Contemporary Confucian Scholars in Hong Kong Chinese University, sponsored by Department of Philosophy, Hong Kong Chinese University. Hong Kong, Dec.  
20-23, 2004.
10. “Mou Zong-san’s Study on Rural China in 1930s,” presented at the International Symposium of the 7th Contemporary New Confucianism, sponsored by the School of Philosophy, Wuhan University. Wuhan, China, Sept. 10-12, 2005.
11. “Contemporary Reconstruction of Confucianism: A Global Context,”  
presented at the International Conference on Eastern Civilizations in Globalization, sponsored by Peking University and Harvard-Yenching Institute.  
Beijing, China, Nov.13-14, 2005.
12. “Inter-religious Dialogue: the Core Endeavor of the Development of the Third Epoch of Confucianism,” presented at the International Confucian Forum 2005, sponsored by Korean High Education Foundation and Renming University. Beijing, Dec. 9-12, 2005.
13. “Bodily and Spiritual Exercise: the Religious Significant of Zhu Xi’s Interpretation of Confucian Classics,” presented at the International Conference on Interpretation, Hermeneutics and Confucian Tradition, Taipei, Jan. 11-13, 2006. Sponsored by the Institute of Literature and Philosophy, Academia Sinica.
14. “Confucian Identity in Multiple Religious Participations: An Example of Wang Ji (1498-1583),” presented at the International Conference on Neo-Confucianism and Global Philosophy, sponsored by Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, Wesleyan University. Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, USA, Feb.24-26, 2006.
15. “Bodily and Spiritual Exercise: the Religious Significance of Zhu Xi’s Interpretation of Confucian Classics,” presented at the Conference on Zhu Xi and the Four Books: Commentaries,Hermeneutics, and Philosophical Construction, sponsored by the Research Centre for Chinese Philosophy and Culture, Department of Philosophy, CUHK. Hong Kong, May 16-18, 2006.
16. “Construction of a Society with Public Reasoning: The Real Quintessence of Democratic Thought of Huang Zongxi (1610-1695),” presented at the International Conference on Huang Zongxi’s People-oriented Political Thought, sponsored by the Academy of Social Sciences of Zhejiang province and Yuyao City Government. Yuyao, China, April1-4, 2006.
17. “Mou Zongsan’s Study of Rural China in the 1930s,” presented at the Second Chinese Cultural Forum: Rural China and Cultural Self-Awareness.  
Beijing, China, August 23-24.
18. “Three Self-awareness in the Study of Chinese Philosophy,” presented at the International Conference on Contemporary reflection and Prospect on the Construction of Chinese Philosophy, sponsored by the Institute of Traditional Chinese Scholarship, Shenzhen University and the School of Asian Studies, Australian National University. Shenzhen, China, Dec. 12-14, 2006.
19. “Ontology and Methodology: Zheng Qidou (Xiagu, 1649-1736) versus Wang Ji (Longxi, 1498-1583),” presented at the International Conference on Zheng Xiagu and His Yangming School in Korea, sponsored by Korea Association for Yangming Learning. Jianghua Island, Korea, Nov. 2-4, 2006.
20. “Re-reflection on the Methodology of the Study on Chinese Philosophy as a Discipline,” presented at the International Conference on Paradigm Reconstruction and Hermeneutics of Confucian Philosophy, sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, Soochow University, Taiwan, May 25-27, 2007.
21. “Religious Significance of Confucian Hermeneutics: Zhu Xi’s Method of Reading and Christian Lectio Divina,” presented at the Conference on Confucian-Christian Dialogue in a Contemporary Context: Theory and Practice, sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and Religion, Baptist University of Hong Kong and Shandong University. Hong Kong, May 30-June 1, 2007.
22. “Tang Junyi on Spirituality,” presented at the International Conference on Contemporary and Spirituality, sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and Religion, Baptist University of Hong Kong. Hong Kong, Nov.  
15-16, 2007.
23. “Ritual Practice as a Bodily and Spiritual Exercise: Focusing on chapter xiangdang in Lunyu(the Analects),” presented at the International Conference on Body Narrative in East Asian Confucianism, sponsored by Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Taiwan University. Taipei, Taiwan, Nov. 23-24, 2007.
24. “Confucian Classics in a Changing Contemporary China,” presented at the International Conference on General Education and Core Curriculum, Classics for an Emerging World, sponsored by Heyman Center for the Humanities & Committee for Asia and Middle East, Columbia University. Columbia University, New York City, USA, Jan. 19-20, 2008.
25. “Hou Wailu and the Paradigm and Methodology of Chinese Philosophy as a Modern Discipline,” presented at the Second Workshop, The Formation and Development of Academic Disciplines in 20th Century China”, sponsored by Australian National University and Central Nationality University, Beijing, Oct.30-Nov. 1, 2008.
26. “Tang Junyi(Tang Chun-I) and Indian Philosophy”, presented at the International Conference Celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Department of Philosophy, CUHK, the Centenary of Tang Chun-I, and the 60th anniversary of New Asia College, CUHK, Hong Kong, May 18-21.
27. “Confucian Classics in a Changing Contemporary China,” presented at the international Conference on Confucianism and Modern Society, sponsored by the International Institute for Asian Studies and Modern East Asia Research Center, Leiden University, The Netherlands.
28. “Inside the Revival of Confucianism in Mainland China: the Vicissitudes of Confucian Classics in Contemporary China as an Example,” presented at “Confucianism for the 21st Century,” the International Conference on the Occasion of the 100th Anniversary of Sinology in Hamburg, Sponsored by the Asien-Afrika-Institut of the Universität Hamburg, Germany, Sept.21-23, 2009.
29. “Dialogical Confucianism as a Religious Tradition in a Global Context,” presented at “The 2009 Global Forum on Civilization and Peace”, Sponsored by the Academy of Korean Studies, Dec. 2-3, 2009.
30. “Paradigm and Methodology: Hou Wailu and the study of ‘the History of Chinese Philosophy’,” presented at the international Conference on “National Identity and Consciousness of History: History and Modernity,”  
jointly sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, Leiden University, the Netherlands, the Academy of Literature and History, Fudan University, and the Center for Philosophy, Tokyo University, Shanghai: the Academy of Literature and History, Fudan University, Dec. 14-17, 2009.
31. “The Dialogical Dimension in Confucian Tradition and Its Contributions,” presented at the International Conference on “Dewey’s Second Mission to China: A Dialogue between Pragmatism and Confucianism,”  
sponsored by Changjiang Education Foundation, Beijing Foreign Studies University, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Peking University Press, Beijing:  
Beijing Foreign Studies University, Dec. 18-20, 2009.
32. “Confucian Classics and General Education in Contemporary China,”  
presented at the 3rd International Forum of Confucianism in Quzhou, sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and Zhejiang Academy of Social Sciences, Quzhou, Sept. 26-28, 2010.
33. “On the Newly Discovered Lixue Lu by Jiang Xizhe姜希轍(?-1698),”  
presented at the international conference on “re-thinking the History of Ming Dynasty and the Trend of Modern China,” sponsored by the Department of Chinese Culture of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, April 11-12, 2011.
34. “Self-Cultivation and Statecraft: Spiritual and Bodily Exercise in Dong Zhongshu’s Thought,” presented at the international conference on “Self-Cultivation, Education and Political Philosophy in Confucian Tradition,” sponsored by the Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Academia Sinica, April 28-29, 2011.
35. “Confucian Self Cultivation as a Spiritual and Bodily Exercise and Its Therapeutic Significance,” “Body and Person in China,” Sponsored by the Confucius Institute and the Center of Oriental Studies of Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania, June 6-8, 2011.
36. “English Studies of Zhu Xi in Three Decades: Overview, Trend, and Significance,”“Philosophy and Time: International Conference on Zhu Xi and His Learning,” Sponsored by Chinese Society of the Learning Of Zhu Xi, Nanchang University, and Jiujiang College, Ocotber19-22.
37. “Mou Zongsan’e Critique of Materialistic Dialectics and Historical Materialism,” “Contemporary New Confucianism and Western Philosophy: the 9th international Conference on Contemporary New Confucianism,” Sponsored by Philosophy Department of Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Chinese of Taiwan Central University, and Taiwan Normal University, Hong Kong, Dec. 7-9, 2011.
38. “Reflection on the Revival of Confucianism in Mainland China,”“A Habit of the Heart: Confucianism and Contemporary East Asian Cultures,”  
Sponsored by Department of Public and Social Administration, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Dec. 10-14, 2011.

Review Articles
1. Establishing a Paradigm for Studies on Chinese Philosophy: Review on Chen Lai’s You Wu Zhi Jing. Beida Journal of Philosophy. Vol. 6 No. 1, 2006, pp.  
223-241.

Reviews
1. History in Classics and Writings: Review of Qian Mu’s Chinese Studies.  
CBBR Book Review Weekly, 23rd edition, January 2002.
2. Confucianism: Between Liberalism and Communitarianism. CBBR Book Review Weekly, 14th edition, April 2002.
3. Review on Lu Miawfen’s The Wang Yang-ming School during the Ming
Dynasty: History, Thought and Practice. Newsletter of the Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Vol.24, Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Academia Sinica. March. 2004, pp.350-354.
4. Confucian Culture Standpoint and Value Concern: Reading Chen Lai’s Tradition and Modernity, Studies in Chinese Culture, Vol. 1, 2007, Spring, pp. 203-206.
5. Review on An Intellectual History of the Analects, Newsletter of the Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy, Academia Sinica, Vol. 18, No.1, March 2008, pp.205-212.
6. Study on Bamboo and Silk Versions of Wuxing and Other Newly Unearthed Confucian Texts. New Frontiers in Asian Scholarship, Newsletter of Harvard Yenching Institute, August 2010.

TRANSLATIONS
1. Herbert Fingarette, Confucius: The Secular as Sacred. New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1972. Chinese translation, Nanjing: Jiangsu People Press, August 2002.
2. John Berthrong, All Under Heaven: Transforming Paradigms in Confucian-Christian Dialogue. New York: SUNY Press, 1994. Chinese translation, Shi-jia-zhuang: Hebei People’s Publishing House, Dec. 2006.
3. Roger T. Ames, Consummatory Becoming of the Self: The Selection of Roger T. Ames. Dialogue among Civilizations Series, Chinese translation,
Shi-jia-zhuang: Hebei People’s Publishing House, July 2006.
4. Tu Weiming, Confucian Tradition and Dialogue among Civilizations. Dialogue among Civilizations Series, Chinese translation, Shi-jia-zhuang: Hebei People’s Publishing House, August 2006.
5. Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Berthrong, ed., Confucianism and Ecology: The Interrelation of Haven, Earth and Humans. Harvard University Press, 1998.  
Chinese Translation, Jiangsu Education Press, 2008.
6. Roger T. Ames, Focusing the Familiar: A Translation and Philosophical Interpretation of the Zhongyong. Chinese translation, Beijing: the Press of Chinese Social Sciences, 2011.
7. Tu Weiming and Mary Evelyn Tucker, edited, Confucian Spirituality.  
Crossroad, 2004. Chinese translation, Beijing: the Press of Chinese Social Sciences, 2011, forthcoming.

Articles
1. Irene Bloom, Wing-tsit Chan (1904-1994): a Selection of Oral Autobiography. In China Review International. Chinese translation published in Chinese Culture (Beijing, Hong Kong and Taiwan) (1997): 15-16, pp.327-347.
2. Alasdair MacIntyre, Incommensurability, Truth and the Conversation between Confucians and Aristotelians about the Virtue. Paper presented at the Sixth East-West Philosophers Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, July 1989. Chinese translation published in Confucius Studies (1998) No. 4, pp.25-38.
3. John Berthrong, Trends in the Interpretation of Confucian Religiosity in the West. Appendix of John Berthrong’s All under Heaven: Transforming Paradigms in Confucian-Christian Dialogue (New York: SUNY Press, 1994).  
Chinese translation published in Seeking Truth (2002) No. 6, pp.27-36.
4. Roger T. Ames, the Daodejing and Correlative Cosmology: An Interpretive Context. Chinese translation published in Seeking Truth (2003) No. 2, pp.5-12.
5. Roger T. Ames, Death as Transformation in Classical Daoism. Chinese translation published in Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (2004):  
3. August 2004.
6. Roger T. Ames, Confucianism and Deweyan Pragmatism: A Dialogue. Chinese translation published in Globalization and Dialogue among Civilizations, Harvard-Yenching Academic Series, No.4, 2004.
7. John Berthrong, All Under Heaven: Transforming Paradigms in Confucian-Christian Dialogue. Chinese translation published in International Sinology Vol. 12, 2005.

Chapters of Books
1. Alasdair MacIntyre, the Three Rival Version of Moral Enquiry. Notre Dame,
Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 1990. Chapter 1.Chinese translation published by Chinese Social Sciences Press, 1999, pp.10-30.
2. Tu Weiming, Confucianism, in Arvind Sharma edited. Our Religions, HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, pp.139-228. Chinese translation published in Tu Weiming, East Asian Value and Multiple Modernity published by Chinese Social Sciences Press, 2001, pp.119-216.
3. Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall, New Interpretation of the Zhongyong:  
Philosophical and Religious Approach. Part of Ames and Hall’s Focusing the
Familiar: a Translation and Philosophical Interpretation of the Zhongyong.  
Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2001. Chinese translation published in Journal of the History of Chinese Philosophy (2002): 3. August 2002, pp5-17.
4. John Berthrong, All Under Heaven: Transforming Paradigms in Confucian-Christian Dialogue. First chapter of his All under Heaven:  
Transforming Paradigms in Confucian-Christian Dialogue. Chinese translation published in International Sinology Vol. 12, 2005.

WONG Yuk

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Yuk Wong (王煜)
Stay at HYI: Sep 1985—Jun 1986
Program
Country
Field of Study
University Affiliation

WONG Yuk

no image
Yuk Wong (王煜)
Stay at HYI: Sep 1978—Jun 1979
Country
Field of Study
University Affiliation

MIURA Shuichi

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Shuichi Miura
Stay at HYI: Jul 2000—Jul 2001
Country
Field of Study
University Affiliation

LIU Xiaogan

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Xiaogan Liu (刘笑敢)
liux@cuhk.edu.hk
Stay at HYI: Sep 1988—Jun 1989

KOBAYASHI Masayoshi

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Masayoshi Kobayashi (小林正美)
k-masayoshi@nyc.odn.ne.jp
Stay at HYI: Sep 1983—Jun 1984
Country
Field of Study
University Affiliation

GU Wei-kang

GU Wei-kang
Wei Kang Gu (顧偉康)
Stay at HYI: Sep 1992—Jun 1993
Country
Field of Study
University Affiliation
Current Affiliation
  • Buddhist College of Singapore

Current Research Projects and Interests:the philosophy of Chan Buddhism, the history of Chinese Buddhist translation

 

Recent Publications

BOOKS 

1、ZEN-- CULTURAL ASSIMILATION AND HISTORICAL CHOICE.(in Chinese)Affairs Press Shanghai  1990
禪宗︰文化交融與歷史選擇 (上海知識出版社  1990年)

 

2、ON THE HARMONY BETWEEN RELIGION AND THE SOCIETY. (in Chinese) Xue Lin Press Shanghai  1992
宗教協調論  (上海學林出版社  1992年) 

3、BUDDHA HELD UP A FLOWER AND KASYAPA SMILED.(in Chinese)Chung Hwa Book Co. Hong Kong.1993
拈花微笑--禪者的智慧  (香港中華書局  1993年)

4、IN SEARCH OF THE SECRET OF FAITH.(in Chinese)Education Press. Shanghai. 1993
信仰探幽(上海教育出版社  1993年)

 5、THE SIX PHASE IN THE ZEN HISTORY.(in Chinese)Sanmin Book Co. Taiwan. 1994
禪宗六變(臺灣三民書局  1994年)

6、THE HISTORY OF THE ASSIMILATION BETWEEN ZEN AND PURE LAND. (in Chinese)Sanmin Book Co. Taiwan. 1996
禪淨合一流略(臺灣三民書局  1996年)

7、SIX CHAPTERS TO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE DIAMOND SUTRA  (in Chinese) Shanghai Ancient Books Publishing House 2011/05
《金剛經解疑六講》上海古籍出版社  2011年5月

8、A HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE ASSIMILATION BETWEEN CHAN AND JIN TU (in Chinese)  Shanghai Academy of Social Science Press 2012/01
《禪淨合一溯源》上海社科出版社  2012年1月

PAPERS

1、THE FIRST COSMOLOGY IN CHINESE PHILOSOPHY HISTORY ---- ON THE COSMOLOGY OF HUAI NAN ZI  (in Chinese) Academic Quarterly 1986/02   Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences 中國哲學史上第一個宇宙論體系——論《淮南子》的宇宙論(《上海社會科學院學術季刊》1986年02期 )

2、CHAN ---- THE MUTUAL CHOICE BETWEEN CHINESE CULTURAL AND INDIA CULTURAL. Academic Quarterly 1990/02   Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences 禪宗——中國文化和印度文化的相互選擇  (《上海社會科學院學術季刊》1990年02期 )

3、REVIEWS ON THE CHAN HISTORY OF HU SHI (胡適)  (in Chinese) CHINESE CULTURE  1992/No.6 評胡適的禪史研究——1969年爭論《壇經》的回顧與思考   (《中國文化》1992年第6期)

 4、ON THE LACK RELIGION IDEAS AND THE PROSPEROUS RELIGION EXISTENCE IN ANCIENT CHINA  (in Chinese) Academic Quarterly 1992/01   Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences 論古代中國淡薄的宗教觀念和發達的宗教存在  (《上海社會科學院學術季刊》1992年01期 )

 5、ON CHINESE FOLK BUDDHISM.  (in Chinese) Academic Quarterly 1993/03   Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences 論中國民俗佛教  (《上海社會科學院學術季刊》(1993年03期 )

 6、ON THE FOUR OPTIONS(四料簡) OF YONG MING YAN SHOU(永明延壽)  (in Chinese)    CHAN REVIEW 2000/No.4 永明延壽的禪淨四料簡  (《禪學研究》2000年04期)

 7、SAGE (聖人)、SUPERIOR Man (君子 NOBLER TYPE)、INFERIOR MAN(小人)── THE IDEAL MAN IN CHINA  (in English.)    “Chinese Philosophy” International Conference in Beijing. 2002 聖人、君子和小人――論中國人的理想人格  (中國哲學國際討論會  北京2002)

8、TENTATIVE RE-EXAMINING OF MASTER ZONG MI’S RECONCILING OF DIFFERENT VIEWS AMONG THE CHAN SCHOOL  (in Chinese)

CHAN SYUDYS 2004/11 圭峰宗密「和會禪宗」再探  (《中國禪學》第三卷,2004年11月)

9、RANDOMLY TALKING ON THE STRUCTURAL PARTITIONS OF THE DIAMOND SUTRA  (in Chinese)  JUE QUN Buddhist Study 2007
漫談《金剛經》之科分  (《覺群佛學》2007)

10、MING SHI JI(冥世偈)IN DIAMOND SUTRAMINNAN BUDDHISM  (in Chinese)    MING NAN Buddhist Study 2007 No.5 關於《金剛經》的冥世偈  (《閩南佛學》2007年第五輯) 

11、A BRIEF HISTORY OF CHINESE BUDDHIST TRANSLATIONS----FOR THE COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN CHINESE AND WESTERN PHILOSOPHY  (in Chinese)   Academic Monthly 2009/03 No.41 佛經翻譯與“格義”時代的跨越  (《學術月刊》2009年3月,第41卷,3月號)

12、THREE PATTERMS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONFUCIANISM AND BUDDHISM  ( in Chinese)     Philosophical Analysis 2010/No.4   Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences 入華佛教對應儒佛關系的三個典型  (《哲學分析》2010年第4期) 

13、RE-EXAMINING ON THE TEN RULES BY QING LANG WEN YI  (in Chinese)   CHAN SYUDYS 2012/11 清涼文益《宗門十規論》考評  (《中國禪學》第六卷,2012年11月) 

14、RE-EXAMINING THE DEBATE OVER A BUDDHIST MONASTIC’S BOWING TO THE EMPEROR IN THE EASTERN JIN DYNASTY  (in Chinese)     Dharma Drum Journal of Buddhist Studies, no. 11, (2012) New Taipei City: Dharma Drum Buddhist College 東晉“敬王之爭”考評  (《法鼓佛學學報》第11 期 (民國101 年),新北市:法鼓佛教學院)

15、REFLECTION OF THE CHAN BOOM AT THE END OF LAST CENTURY  (in Chinese)  Journal of East China Normal University  2013  No.2對上世紀末“禪宗熱”的反思  (《華東師範大學學報》2013年2期)

16、REREAD THE INSCRIPTION OF MASTER JINGSHANIN HELIN TEMPLE, RUNZHOU WRITTEN BY LIHUA Studies in World Religions   2013  No3 重讀李華〈潤州鶴林寺故徑山大師碑銘〉——“牛頭祖統說”再研究   (《世界宗教研究》2013年3期)

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